Northeast Aquatic Nuisance Species Panel Forum

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Invasive species in the media

With invasive species infestations becoming more common, the mainstream media is picking up with more stories about how it affects governments, tourism, fisheries, and other industries. Please post links to stories here and share your experiences.

Comments

Comment from Michele L Tremblay on December 15, 2016 at 10:00 am

Executive Order — Safeguarding the Nation from the Impacts of Invasive Species
December 5, 2016
https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/12/05/executive-order-safeguarding-nation-impacts-invasive-species

Comment from Michele L Tremblay on March 23, 2016 at 7:24 am

This little flea — and its huge appetite — could ruin the Great Lakes
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2016/03/22/this-little-flea-and-its-huge-appetite-could-ruin-the-great-lakes/?wpisrc=nl_rainbow

Comment from Michele L Tremblay on November 10, 2015 at 10:59 am

Invasive marine species benefit from rising CO2 levels
http://www.enn.com/top_stories/article/49140

Comment from Michele L Tremblay on November 10, 2015 at 7:23 am

The environmental, and economic, costs of invasive species
Ignoring the impacts of ecosystem changes comes with a price tag
BY ALEXANDRA PECCI, New Hampshire Business Review
Published: January 10, 2014
http://www.nhbr.com/January-10-2014/The-environmental-and-economic-costs-of-invasive-species/

Comment from Michele L Tremblay on August 24, 2015 at 10:41 am

“Weed Whackers: Monsanto, glyphosate, and the war on invasive species”
http://harpers.org/archive/2015/09/weed-whackers/

Comment from Moderator on August 12, 2015 at 12:12 pm

Range of non-native marine species is explained by time introduced
http://www.enn.com/top_stories/article/48863

Please share your thoughts.

Comment from Moderator on June 2, 2015 at 10:43 am

Hunting in Maine: 3 Invasive Species to Maine and Its Rules for Hunting Them
Nice article mentioning the NEANS Panel and its Maine partners.
http://www.newsmax.com/FastFeatures/Maine-hunting-invasive-species/2015/06/01/id/647984/#ixzz3buqxAci5
Urgent: Rate Obama on His Job Performance. Vote Here Now!
http://www.newsmax.com/FastFeatures/Maine-hunting-invasive-species/2015/06/01/id/647984/

Comment from Moderator on December 9, 2014 at 9:53 am

Battling invasive species can be a mistake, ecologist says
Humans may be the only real invasive species, Ken Thompson says

By Jim Lebans, CBC Radio Posted: Dec 06, 2014 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: Dec 06, 2014 5:00 AM ET
http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/battling-invasive-species-can-be-a-mistake-ecologist-says-1.2861822?cmp=rss

Comment from Moderator on December 2, 2014 at 4:32 pm

The last places on Earth with no invasive species
http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20140909-are-alien-species-everywhere

Comment from Moderator on November 25, 2014 at 1:13 pm

What will those crazy kids in the Great Lakes think of next?
Now on tap: Beer brewed with zebra mussels and milfoil right from Lake Minnetonka
http://www.startribune.com/local/west/283551301.html

Comment from Moderator on November 13, 2014 at 11:56 am

Bureaucracy Rock Snot
CANADIAN PRESS | September 7, 2014
http://asf.ca/bureaucracy-rock-snot.html

Comment from Michele L Tremblay on October 15, 2014 at 12:14 pm

Windsor man charged with hiding 51 turtles on body in bizarre smuggling case
Agents at Detroit-Windsor crossing found man had ‘irregularly shaped bulges’ in his pants

CBC News Posted: Sep 25, 2014 5:09 PM ET Last Updated: Sep 26, 2014 9:14 AM ET
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/windsor/windsor-man-charged-with-hiding-51-turtles-on-body-in-bizarre-smuggling-case-1.2778155

Comment from Michele L Tremblay on October 9, 2014 at 12:47 pm

Invasive Species: Do We Worry Too Much?
http://www.wpr.org/listen/647121

Damage from invasive species cost the United States more than $120 billion each year, and are reported to threaten the survival of more than 400 endangered species. In Wisconsin ecologists have their eyes on zebra mussels, Asian carp, Emerald Ash Borer and others. But is every invasive species as bad as we make it out to be?

Far too often we are spending too much money to rid ourselves of invasive species, according to Dr. Ken Thompson, Lecturer for the Department of Animal and Plant Sciences at the University of Sheffield. Most people believe the World yesterday is the way it ought to be, Thompson believes that where ever species are right now is where they belong in some sort of way.

Take the Camel family, for example. Over 40 millions years ago the camel family evolved in what is now the United States. After a period of tens of millions of years they went extinct in America. This coincides with the timing of when man arrived. Most of the surviving camels today are to be found in South America: so Thompson raises the question, are they invasive?

Thompson feels that not every alien species is okay and should be left alone, but many of these invasives have beneficial attributes and fit into their new environment, often without much pomp and circumstance. He assets that the focus should be on battling the right targets.

Comment from Michele L Tremblay on October 8, 2014 at 1:36 pm

The green snot taking over the world’s rivers
A strange green organism has spread around the globe, clogging up the world’s rivers
http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20140922-green-snot-takes-over-worlds-rivers

Comment from Michele L Tremblay on October 8, 2014 at 1:36 pm

Green crab shell secret cracked
Discovery could make green crab a popular food, say researchers
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/green-crab-shell-secret-cracked-1.2785045?cmp=rss

Comment from Tom Trott on August 14, 2014 at 5:26 pm

Great story! Make me wonder if mud worms made their way from the Ivory Coast to the Caribbean the same way.

Comment from Michele L Tremblay on August 14, 2014 at 9:07 am

Maritime sea life linked to early European explorers
UNB research points to Champlain, Hudson expeditions bringing mud shrimp, mud worms
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/maritime-sea-life-linked-to-early-european-explorers-1.2735279?cmp=rss

Comment from Moderator on August 6, 2014 at 10:12 am

Thank you to Meg Modley for this great post about the effects of invasive species in the Great Lakes: http://www.jsonline.com/news/wisconsin/how-invasive-species-changed-the-great-lakes-forever-b99297128z1-267010971.html

Comment from Tom Trott on March 23, 2014 at 10:48 am

The swap is a nice idea, but faces economic challenges. The elver fishery is so lucrative (except not as for perhaps this year, with record catches of A. japonica) and a green cab fishery not so profitable that monetarily, costs of switching would outweigh the benefits. The long-term monetary benefits of possibly reducing green crab populations this way may be too intangible to motivate fisherman to switch.

Comment from Michele L Tremblay on March 23, 2014 at 9:01 am

Green crab for eel swap proposed by DFO
Change would hit invasive crab population, preserve threatened eels
CBC News Posted: Mar 21, 2014 7:04 AM AT Last Updated: Mar 21, 2014 8:46 AM AT
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/green-crab-for-eel-swap-proposed-by-dfo-1.2581261?cmp=rss

Comment from Michele L Tremblay on March 20, 2014 at 10:57 am

Invasive Burmese Pythons Can Find Their Way Back Home
http://www.enn.com/top_stories/article/47181

Comment from Michele L Tremblay on March 18, 2014 at 8:23 am

Invasive species top list of state tourism threats
http://www.cadillacnews.com/news_story/?story_id=1816909&year=2014&issue=20140317
The real story for natural resource professionals is the results of the survey that shows that the public is aware of and concerned about invasive species.

Comment from Michele L Tremblay on March 1, 2014 at 11:08 am

More on Didymo and climate change
http://www.cbc.ca/player/News/Technology/ID/2439779643/

Comment from Michele L Tremblay on March 1, 2014 at 8:54 am

Rock snot found to be native algae species in N.B.
Didymo was previously thought to be an invasive species in Eastern Canada
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/rock-snot-found-to-be-native-algae-species-in-n-b-1.2554825?cmp=rss

Comment from Moderator on February 26, 2014 at 1:55 pm

Zebra and Quagga mussels in the news
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/25/science/science-takes-on-a-silent-invader.html?hpw&rref=science&_r=2

Comment from Moderator on January 17, 2014 at 11:19 am

The environmental, and economic, costs of invasive species
Ignoring the impacts of ecosystem changes comes with a price tag
http://www.nhbr.com/core/pagetools.php?pageid=56948&url=%2FJanuary-10-2014%2FThe-environmental-and-economic-costs-of-invasive-species%2F&mode=print

Comment from Michele L Tremblay on December 29, 2013 at 1:15 pm

Tougher exotic pet laws promised following python deaths
How new rules would be enforced remains unclear
CBC News December 6, 2013
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/tougher-exotic-pet-laws-promised-following-python-deaths-1.2453253

Comment from Michele L Tremblay on December 10, 2013 at 12:59 pm

Trouble in the clam flats
http://www.gloucestertimes.com/local/x1636696776/Trouble-in-the-clam-flats/print

Comment from Moderator on November 20, 2013 at 12:22 pm

Marauding carp
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/20/opinion/beware-marauding-carp.html?hpw

Comment from Michele L Tremblay on October 30, 2013 at 7:53 am

An update on species in the Bay of Fundy in a recent CBC posting
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/invasive-aquatic-species-in-bay-of-fundy-being-investigated-1.2287079?cmp=rss

Comment from Michele L Tremblay on September 21, 2013 at 9:53 am

Another Mola Mola in New Brunswick
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/rare-mola-mola-washes-up-in-miramichi-river-1.1860144?cmp=rss

Comment from Michele L Tremblay on August 27, 2013 at 9:11 am

Mola Mola washes ashore in Bay of Fundy
Another tropical fish enjoying the increasingly warmer waters of the North Atlantic
http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/story/2013/08/22/nb-mola-mola-bay-fundy.html

Comment from Michele L Tremblay on January 17, 2013 at 12:39 pm

Invading Plants
http://www.enn.com/top_stories/article/45476
This article sites a study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) reports that recent statements that invasive plants are not problematic are often based on incomplete information, with insufficient time having passed to observe the full effect of invasions on native biodiversity. Invasive plant life simply may take longer to “take over” than invasive animals. There are links to other invasive species stories to the right of this story.

Comment from Michele L Tremblay on December 26, 2012 at 10:14 am

Alien Entrées and EattheInvaders.org
This topic has generated a lot of discussion over the past year. A short piece by Elizabeth Kolbert was featured in The Talk of the Town section of 12.20.12 New Yorker. It features the Panel’s own Joe Roman and was centered on an event Williams College.
Learn more at http://eattheinvaders.org/alien-entrees/

Comment from Michele L Tremblay on December 12, 2012 at 2:22 pm

On first blush, this does not seem to be a story related to invasive species but you can read that the “bait and switch” from one species to another may be an opportunity to substitute cheap, non-native seafood or at least not know what a species is in these fraudulent food markets.
http://www.enn.com/top_stories/article/45335

Comment from Michele L Tremblay on November 30, 2012 at 3:41 pm

The Invasion of the Boa Constrictors (and related articles)
http://www.enn.com/top_stories/article/45284

Comment from Michele L Tremblay on November 28, 2012 at 7:59 am

State clamps down in fish case
Pet dealer admits guilt in smuggling of invasive snakeheads
Read more: http://www.timesunion.com/local/article/State-clamps-down-in-fish-case-4038630.php#ixzz2DWPmIJ97
http://www.timesunion.com/local/article/State-clamps-down-in-fish-case-4038630.php

Comment from Michele L Tremblay on August 26, 2012 at 5:22 pm

Invasive brittle star could change appearance and ecology of Atlantic coral reefs
http://www.enn.com/top_stories/article/44848

Comment from Michele L Tremblay on August 10, 2012 at 11:33 am

Green Crabs are not news but their incursion into Malpeque Bay on Prince Edward Island could be a blow to their famous oysters. The full story is posted at http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/story/2012/08/09/pei-invasive-green-crab-attack-shellfish-584.html

Comment from John McPhedran on August 2, 2012 at 11:58 am

See the results of Clearwater Lake (Maine) Association’s recent Chinese mystery snail harvest. They’re hoping to pull this off next year, too.
http://www.dailybulldog.com/db/features/thats-a-lot-of-snails-504-pounds-pulled-from-clearwater-lake/

Comment from Michele L Tremblay on July 30, 2012 at 5:44 pm

Invasive plant species guide launched
CBC News Posted: Jul 30, 2012 9:22 AM AT
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/story/2012/07/30/nb-invasive-plants-species-guide.html

Comment from Michele L Tremblay on July 20, 2012 at 11:41 am

Invasive species from “across the pond.” This spurs an interesting pathways discussion. Please post your thoughts here.
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/story/2012/07/19/nb-bluefire-jellyfish-bay-fundy.html

Comment from Michele L Tremblay on July 12, 2012 at 8:30 pm

Report says Asian carp could reach all 5 Great Lakes in 20 years
(study led by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada, which included two U.S. Geological Survey scientists)
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/chi-report-asian-carp-could-reach-all-5-great-lakes-in-20-years-20120712,0,7345202.story

Comment from John McPhedran on July 5, 2012 at 12:33 pm

Observations of boater behavior in Maine suggest that under 20% of boaters inspect their boat and gear on their own. Maine DEP declared 2012 the Year of the Boater Self-Inspection. We’re trying to spread the word that everyone needs to do their part. http://www.necn.com/07/04/12/Boater-The-stuff-does-take-over/landing_newengland.html?blockID=735544&feedID=4206

Comment from Michele L Tremblay on June 29, 2012 at 11:36 am

Irish moss harvest crashing
Very sad news for this traditional harvest and important product for Prince Edward Island. The cause: invasive species. The cost: $228,000 in lost revenues (using the current estimated harvest of 100K lbs vs. the past estimates of 2MM lbs and not taking into consideration possible fucellaria revenues).
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/story/2012/06/29/pei-irish-moss-harvest-584.html

Comment from Michele L Tremblay on June 28, 2012 at 8:20 am

Tourism industry helpless in facing invasive seaweed
Perhaps this sad story will help garner attention and dollars to address invasive species—the tourism industry and municipalities can surely be allies.
http://bostonglobe.com/metro/2012/06/27/invasive-seaweed-threatens-environment-along-new-england-coast/uTX6ZNlhgmtoKg3e5Q1rIP/story.html

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